Articles

What's His Tail Telling You!?

Image
It can be tempting to look at a cat or dog’s body language and interpret as you may another person’s. But cats and dogs are different from people, and sometimes have their own unique body language cues. We’ll teach you how to start recognizing them.  Friendly  A friendly cat's eyes will be alert and blinking, and her ears will be pointed forward while she holds her head up and fans out her whiskers. Aside from looking at her body language, you can also listen to a cat for signs of friendliness. If you hear meowing, she may be looking to interact. Keep in mind that how you interact should be based on the personality of the cat and the context of the situation. Fearful You may have to look closely for indications of fear in your cat, because while her posture may appear calm, a closer look at her face and tail may show distress. A fearful cat may have dilated pupils and flattened ears, and her tail may be held downward, close to her body, while she flattens her whiskers and presses…

Why Cats Pounce and Stalk?

Image
Pouncing, Stalking and a Cat’s Natural Instincts Pouncing and stalking behaviors are perfectly normal for cats. Don't be afraid when your cat performs these actions. It doesn't mean that she's angry or wild, nor will it encourage aggression.  Scratching and Biting That said, if your cat does bite or scratch you during play, stop whatever you're doing and try something different. This will let your cat know that scratching and biting aren't acceptable, and will also ensure that you're not continuing an activity that your cat finds threatening or unpleasant. Hopefully this brief intro to your cat’s instinctive behavior will help you understand her actions.

How to Handle Territorial Aggression in Cats

Image
Is your cat acting up, defending her territory, or otherwise being aggressive? Here are some of the reasons why this happens, and what you can do to help. Territorial Cat Behavior Territorial behavior in cats can present itself in a number of ways, for a number of reasons. Cats are more territorial than dogs by nature, and they can also be more solitary. Territorial behavior in cats usually involves urine marking (spraying), hissing, stalking, or attacking another cat. Territorial behavior can be more serious in cats than in dogs because cats see their territory differently, often viewing newcomers as invaders or intruders, whether it’s a new cat in the household or neighborhood cats outside. Cats are also a little pickier — your cat may tolerate one cat but not another. Intact male cats can be particularly territorial, so it’s important to spay and neuter pet cats. Even friendly, social kittens may become territorial when they mature. To avoid this, it’s best to socialize your kitte…

Why is My Cat Behaving Badly?

Image
Most cats behave badly at some point or another, but sometimes what we determine to be ‘bad’ behavior can be due to a lack of understanding of why cats do what they do. There are a few different ways to remedy bad behavior in cats, but it really starts with trying to better understand your cat. Keep in mind that some of the training techniques that work for dogs aren't always effective for cats. Biting Cats may bite when afraid or angry. This makes it especially important never to tease your cat, which can be frustrating and threatening. If your cat has a medical condition, she may bite because of the pain she's feeling. Whatever the reason, a cat often gives warning signs before she bites. If she is hissing, flattens hers ears or emits a low growl, it's time to back away. If your cat is not acting out because of an injury or illness, it's time for some training. If you've been play-fighting with your cat, stop - it encourages aggressive behavior toward you. Let y…

Why Do Cats Meow?

Image
Understand your cat’s language to better understand your cat. Did you know that cats meow to people, but not to other cats? Adult cats, living apart from humans, have very clear communication with one another. Cat language is spoken mostly through scent, then through facial expression, complex body language and touch. Cat sounds for vocal communication involve caterwauls for mating, chattering upon spotting prey, hissing to ward off an intruder or shrieking when hurt or terrified. Meowing is not part of natural cat language—it was developed almost exclusively for humans. The only meowing in cat language is done between a mother cat and her kittens. A kitten’s tiny “mew” is a cute, endearing sound, used to solicit attention and care from mom cat. Once the kittens are grown, the mews and meows would stop, if not for communicating with humans. So why do cats meow to people? Because meowing is what works. Your cat is dependent on you and quickly learns that you are clearly not picking up…

10 Fascinating Facts About Cats

Image
Learn More About Your Cat. In terms of development, the first year of a cat’s life is equal to the first 15 years of a human life. After its second year, a cat is 25 in human years. And after that, each year of a cat’s life is equal to about 7 human years.Cats can rotate their ears 180 degrees.The hearing of the average cat is at least five times keener than that of a human adult.In the largest cat breed, the average male weighs approximately 20 pounds.Domestic cats spend about 70 percent of the day sleeping. And 15 percent of the day grooming.A cat cannot see directly under its nose.Most cats have no eyelashes.Cats have five toes on each front paw, but only four on the back ones. It’s not uncommon, though, for cats to have extra toes. The cat with the most toes known had 32—eight on each paw!Some believe that if you dream about a white cat, good luck will follow.Meows are not innate cat language—they developed them to communicate with humans!

Traveling with Cats: Great Cat-Friendly Destinations for Summer

Image
So you want to get away from it all this summer, but you don’t want to leave your cat behind. The good news is — with more and more places becoming pet-friendly — you can take a relaxing break and bring your cat along, too! We have several ideas that could make summer travel a ton of fun for both of you. Preparing for Your Trip Before you go anywhere, make sure your cat's shots are up to date, and that she fits comfortably inside her carrier. Bring a towel in case your cat gets wet or muddy. Don't forget medications, a portable litter box, litter, food, special treats, grooming tools, and comfort items such as a favorite blanket or bed. Finally, do a search for “cat-friendly” hotels, restaurants, attractions, etc., for the destinations you’re considering. Learn what kind of accommodations they provide as well. Cat-Friendly Cities Traveling with your cat is better than ever now that cities are more pet-friendly. Many cities feature pet-friendly parks, boutiques and retail stor…